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32nd International Congress on Vision Science and Eye, will be organized around the theme “We Want Everyone Living to Have Good Eye Health”

Vision Science 2022 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Vision Science 2022

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Genetic disorders are caused by mutations in our genes, which modify the resulting proteins.  These mutations may occur spontaneously in an individual or are inherited through the parental chromosomes. They may manifest in the heterozygous state (be present on one chromosome, either paternal or maternal) or in the homozygous state (affecting both alleles).  A mutation that is manifest in the heterozygous state leads to a dominant disorder, whereas mutations that manifest in the homozygous state are referred to as autosomal recessive.  X-linked conditions differ from autosomal types in that women are unaffected or only mildly affected carriers and affected persons are usually male. Other disorders may require the additive effect of mutations in several genes in order to become manifest or require an environmental component; they are then referred to as polygenic or multifactorial.  Some 6,000 human genetic diseases are known and about 1/3rd of these are purely ocular or have ocular manifestations.

  • Track 1-1Congenital Eye Defect
  • Track 1-2Amblyopia (also called lazy eye)
  • Track 1-3Cataracts

Visual impairment, also known as vision impairment, is a medical definition primarily measured based on an individual's better eye visual acuity; in the absence of treatment such as correctable eyewear, assistive devices, and medical treatment visual impairment may cause the individual difficulties with normal daily tasks including reading and walking. Low vision is a functional definition of visual impairment that is chronic, uncorrectable with treatment or correctable lenses, and impacts daily living. As such low vision can be used as a disability metric and varies based on an individual’s experience, environmental demands, accommodations, and access to services.

  • Track 2-1Myasthenia Gravis
  • Track 2-2Conjunctivitis and Allergies
  • Track 2-3Lazy Eye and Turner Syndrome
  • Track 2-4Ocular Migraines

Neuro diagnostic imaging and other techniques, examination of the afferent visual sensory system is still the core of the neuro-ophthalmologic examination. A thorough refraction is an essential part of all clinical neuro ophthalmologic examinations. Confrontation visual fields should be part of every afferent system examination. The relationship between the physical properties of light and perceptual and behavioural responses is known as visual psychophysics, which serves as the foundation for the clinical assessment of visual function. The determination of whether a patient’s visual field improves worsens, or remains stable over time is the most difficult aspect of visual field interpretation. Many attempts have been made to investigate visual field function using evoked potentials to visual stimuli.

  • Track 3-1Colour Vision and Brightness
  • Track 3-2Contract Sensitivity
  • Track 3-3Electro retino gram (ERG)
  • Track 3-4Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP)
  • Track 3-5Pupillary light reflex

The hypothesis that there is a correlation between vision and cognition is based on the impact of vision on mentally stimulating activities. Loss of vision hinders the performance of these tasks (e.g., reading, socializing) and may result in behavioural changes and cognitive decline. Deterioration in vision reportedly reduces physical, mental, and psychosocial activities which can lead to a poor cognitive state.

  • Track 4-1Cognitive Science
  • Track 4-2Visual Mapping
  • Track 4-3Cortical Pathways
  • Track 4-4Behavioural Optometry
  • Track 4-5Eye movement control and active vision

Visual Neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience that focuses on the visual system of the human body, mainly located in the brain's visual cortex. The main goal of visual neuroscience is to understand how neural activity results in visual perception, as well as behaviours dependent on vision. In the past, visual neuroscience has focused primarily on how the brain (and in particular the Visual Cortex) responds to light rays projected from static images and onto the retina. While this provides a reasonable explanation for the visual perception of a static image, it does not provide an accurate explanation for how we perceive the world as it really is, an ever-changing, and ever-moving 3-D environment.

  • Track 5-1Visually-Guided Gaze Behavior
  • Track 5-2Spectrum Sensitivity
  • Track 5-3Neural and Computational Models of Vision
  • Track 5-4Perception of light and shadows

Keratoconus occurs when your cornea the clear, dome-shaped front surface of your eye thins and gradually bulges outward into a cone shape. A cone-shaped cornea causes blurred vision and may cause sensitivity to light and glare. Keratoconus usually affects both eyes, though it often affects one eye more than the other.

  • Track 6-1Corneal cross-linking (CXL)
  • Track 6-2Custom soft contact lenses
  • Track 6-3Hybrid contact lenses
  • Track 6-4Corneal transplant

Dry eye is a condition in which a person doesn't have enough quality tears to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults. With each blink of the eyelids, tears spread across the front surface of the eye, known as the cornea. Tears provide lubrication, reduce the risk of eye infection, wash away foreign matter in the eye and keep the surface of the eyes smooth and clear. Excess tears in the eyes flow into small drainage ducts in the inner corners of the eyelids, which drain into the back of the nose. Dry eyes can occur when tear production and drainage is not in balance.

  • Track 7-1Heavy eyelids
  • Track 7-2Eye fatigue
  • Track 7-3Stinging or burning
  • Track 7-4Keratoconjunctivitis sicca
  • Track 7-5Dysfunctional tear syndrome.

Low vision is the loss of sight that is not correctible with prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. This type of vision loss does not include complete blindness, because there is still some sight and it can sometimes be improved with the use of visual aids.

  • Track 8-1Dementia
  • Track 8-2Diabetic retinopathy
  • Track 8-3Neurologic Conditions
  • Track 8-4Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

Binocular vision is defined and the motor system and sensory system underlying binocular vision are summarised. A simple model of binocular vision is presented and terminology defined. The prevalence of binocular vision anomalies is reviewed, noting that primary eye care practitioners can expect to find binocular vision anomalies in at least one in five patients. The classification of binocular vision anomalies is described, noting that heterophoria can be classified according to the direction of deviation, fixation distance, and compensation. Strabismus can be classified according to constancy, direction of deviation, eye preference, and accommodative state.

  • Track 9-1Low vision devices
  • Track 9-2Diagnosis
  • Track 9-3Patterns of vision and vision loss

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, the health of which is vital for good vision. This damage is often caused by an abnormally high pressure in your eye. Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. It can occur at any age but is more common in older adults.

  • Track 10-1Acute Angle-Closure Glaucoma
  • Track 10-2Adult Glaucoma Suspect
  • Track 10-3Lens-Particle Glaucoma
  • Track 10-4Normal-Tension Glaucoma
  • Track 10-5Primary Congenital Glaucoma.

Visual perception is the ability to perceive our surroundings through the light that enters our eyes. The visual perception of colors, patterns, and structures has been of particular interest in relation to graphical user interfaces (GUIs) because these are perceived exclusively through vision. An understanding of visual perception therefore enables designers to create more effective user interfaces.

  • Track 11-1Visual discrimination
  • Track 11-2Visual memory
  • Track 11-3Visual-spatial relationships

Color  vision deficiency is the inability to distinguish certain shades of color. The term "color blindness" is also used to describe this visual condition, but very few people are completely color blind. Color vision is possible due to photoreceptors in the retina of the eye known as cones. These cones have light-sensitive pigments that enable us to recognize color. Found in the macula (the central part of the retina), each cone is sensitive to either red, green or blue light (long, medium or short wavelengths). The cones recognize these lights based on their wavelengths.  Normally, the pigments inside the cones register different colors and send that information through the optic nerve to the brain. This enables us to distinguish countless shades of color. But if the cones don't have one or more light-sensitive pigments, they will be unable to see all colors.

  • Track 12-1Rod and Cone Interactions in Color Vision
  • Track 12-2Neurology of Vision and Visual Disorders
  • Track 12-3Anatomy of the Mammalian Retina

Ocular oncology involves the study and treatment of tumors that occur in or around the eye. These tumors can range from harmless to potentially life-threatening, and may cause vision loss or loss of the eye itself. Due to the complex nature of ocular oncology, our faculty includes experts in cornea, ophthalmic plastic surgery, pathology, and retina. Mass. Eye and Ear researchers and clinician scientists have experience with a range of conditions, including ocular surface tumors, uveal melanoma, orbital tumors and inflammation, and retinoblastoma.

  • Track 13-1Orbit and Tear
  • Track 13-2Orbit (eye socket) and Eyelids
  • Track 13-3Intraocular Melanoma
  • Track 13-4Retinoblastoma

Vitreoretinal diseases are conditions that affect structures in the eye called the retina and the vitreous. The retina is the light-sensitive layer in the back of the eye that focuses images and transmits that information to the brain via the optic nerve. The vitreous is a clear gel that fills the space between the lens (in the front of the eye) and the retina.

  • Track 14-1Pars plana vitrectomy
  • Track 14-2Retinal Disorders in children
  • Track 14-3Vitrectomy Surgery

Oculoplastic and orbital surgery is plastic surgery focused on the structures surrounding the eye, including the eyelids, orbit (bones of the eye socket), lacrimal system (tear duct system), forehead, and mid face area. Because surgery in these areas can affect vision, ophthalmic plastic surgeons are best qualified to perform this delicate surgery.

  • Track 15-1Eyelid cancer
  • Track 15-2Exophthalmos
  • Track 15-3Entropion

Retinal detachment describes an emergency situation in which a thin layer of tissue (the retina) at the back of the eye pulls away from its normal position. Retinal detachment separates the retinal cells from the layer of blood vessels that provides oxygen and nourishment. The longer retinal detachment goes untreated, the greater your risk of permanent vision loss in the affected eye.

  • Track 16-1Rhegmatogenous
  • Track 16-2Tractional
  • Track 16-3Exudative

Blepharitis is inflammation of the eyelids. Blepharitis usually affects both eyes along the edges of the eyelids. Blepharitis commonly occurs when tiny oil glands near the base of the eyelashes become clogged, causing irritation and redness. Several diseases and conditions can cause blepharitis. Blepharitis is often a chronic condition that's difficult to treat. Blepharitis can be uncomfortable and unsightly. But it usually doesn't cause permanent damage to your eyesight, and it's not contagious.

  • Track 17-1Bacterial conjunctivitis
  • Track 17-2Bacterial keratitis
  • Track 17-3Basal cell carcinoma
  • Track 17-4Chalazion

Strabismus (crossed eyes) is a condition in which the eyes do not line up with one another. In other words, one eye is turned in a direction that is different from the other eye. Under normal conditions, the six muscles that control eye movement work together and point both eyes at the same direction. Patients with strabismus have problems with the control of eye movement and cannot keep normal ocular alignment (eye position).

  • Track 18-1Cerebral palsy
  • Track 18-2Down syndrome
  • Track 18-3Brain tumors
  • Track 18-4Neurological (nervous system) problems